Thursday, January 20, 2022

Could Cannabinoids Found in Hemp Treat or Prevent infections by Covid-19 (SARS-CoV-2)?

This post contains affiliate links. Read more about my paid affiliation on my FTC disclosure page.

The Answer


With cautious optimism, it appears two specific cannabinoids could treat and possibly prevent COVID-19, AKA SARS-CoV-2.  


According to the study "Cannabinoids Block Cellular Entry of SARS-CoV-2 and the EmergingVariants" published in the peer-reviewed journal The Journal of Natural Products, "Orally bioavailable and with a long history of safe human use, these cannabinoids, isolated or in hemp extracts, have the potential to prevent as well as treat infection by SARS-CoV-2 and its variants.  


Specific Cannabinoids


An article published in The Oregonian says, Richard van Breemen, who led the study at Oregon State University, with the help of Fikadu Tafesse from Oregon Health and Science University, was able to test CBGA and CBDA (two specific cannabinoids of many) on live virus, including the original strain of SARS-CoV-2 and two early variants.


Van Breeman also says third-party lab testing can show which products actually contain CBDA and CBGA. We need to see follow-up studies with the same results. If this happens, we hope it does, I suspect those who make edible products and concentrates will provide lab reports with a full breakdown of cannabinoids. 


CBD is considered safe, but it can have side effects, so start low and go slow. From what I read, 1 tsp of hemp flower to 8 oz of water makes a nice tea. There are a plethora of resources for making your own edibles on the internet. 


You can find the lab reports on hemp leaf at Happy Flower Company. Look specifically for CBDA and CBGA.


*If you are on medications please discuss hemp (cannabinoids) with your doctor or pharmacist. Like medications, including those we buy over the counter, it is biochemical.   

 

Additional Reading:

Happy With Hemp: Fibromyalgia And Chronic Pain


In healing

Think adversity?-See opportunity!

The Pained Ink Slayer



~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~



 

Monday, October 18, 2021

A Pocket Full Of Change For Managing Pain This Fall

 


Not every day presents a crisis of earth-shattering magnitude. However, those of us who experience chronic pain do have challenges to overcome on a regular basis making it important to be aware of system breakdown predictors. Factors apparent in a total system breakdown include a loss of our physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual safety net (the four-seated teeter-totter we discuss in this series of books). If we are aware that mounting daily stressors are precursors to a crisis, can we be better prepared should a crisis occur?
 
Symptoms that risks are mounting:
 
  • We become short-tempered.
  • We don't feel rested for several days in a row.
  • We have more difficulty than usual concentrating.
  • We feel overwhelmed and without resources.
  • Our pain is not being managed adequately.
  • We struggle with tasks that we normally manage well.
 
What can we do when we find a consistent pattern that could be leading up to a coping failure? We can:
 
  • Delay chores or break them down into segments.
  • Approach each day individually and break it down by each hour if necessary.
  • Summon help from support system members or healthcare providers.
  • Give ourselves permission to rest.
  • Change what we can, and let the rest go.
  • Accept that some days doing the minimum allows us to charge our battery and prevent a total breakdown later.
  • Focus on our successes.
 
Preparedness Is the Next Best Thing to an Apple Pie, Day Three, Broken Body, Wounded Spirit: Balancing the See-Saw of Chronic Pain, Fall Devotions by Celeste Cooper RN and Jeff Miller, PhD. Read the reviews on Amazon here.
 
An effective tool for combating the effects of stress is positive thinking.  So when my stress meter is about to blow mercury into the universe, I open my tool kit.
 
  • Say no to negativity.
  • See opportunity in adversity
  • Say, “I will.”
  • Do a kindness.
  • Create a positive word list.
  • Imagine positive energy.
  • Have a positive dialogue with my body.
  • Write an affirmation.
  • Write an “I am” or “I like” poem or phrase.
 
From my private collection...

The Promise of Like ©
 
I like camping, picnics, mountains with streams,
Invading my space and into my dreams,
Loony family, self, friends, and birds,
Even failing to speak with words.
 
Fortune to learn, watching children at play,
Scenery, lakes that reflect on the day,
Cakes, spirituality, flowers, a good book,
And cactus that winks with a funny look.
 
Mixed sun, rain, fall, a cloud that churns,
Laughter, antiques, Hummel’s and urns,
Gentle music, dogs, sea horses and cats,
Wildlife inspires me, even the bats.
 
I like promise and hope, flowers I like.
I like beginnings and endings, I just like.
 
Written by Celeste Cooper, author (Colorado, 2011). I wrote this poem from a random list of things I like.

Find more tips that are helpful in our Broken Body, Wounded Spirit: Balancing the See-Saw of Chronic Pain series and Integrative Therapies for Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Myofascial Pain: The Mind-body Connection available at https://www.amazon.com/Celeste-Cooper/e/B002X2IZYG
 
 In healing
Think adversity?-See opportunity!

The Pained Ink Slayer



~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~



Saturday, May 29, 2021

Accepting Our Limits While Exploring Our Passion

 

Courtesy Celeste's Photography

ACCEPTING OUR LIMITS

As people who live with chronic pain and illness, we know the importance of identifying our limitations and learning to work within our boundaries. These coping impositions and repositions mostly affect our physical capabilities and our abilities to perform certain tasks.  We talk about Measuring Limits” in our book Integrative Therapies for Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Myofascial Pain: The Mind-body Connection. (Cooper, C and Miller, J, 2010


Regardless of courage or decisiveness, your first task is to accurately assess your ability today. You need an objective measure for determining if this is a “terrific” or “semi-terrific” day... Every day you should spend all your available energy pennies, but not one more. One extra penny of effort today will cost a dollar tomorrow. Make daily deposits in your well-being bank... At the same time, you need to do a balancing act with your unconscious process of self-accommodation and deceit, the permission we give ourselves to loaf, stall, or nonperform. This tendency to give up prematurely, surrender to dread, to drop our own ball at the first sign of difficulty is universal. That’s right, universal. Everyone knows the decision to let the Frisbee pass without diving to try to catch it... The key point is that the one judging is also guilty

at some time.

 

Who we are is more than the body or the personality.

Ram Dass

 

It is equally important to explore what we can do. In Broken Body, Wounded Spirit: Balancing theSee-Saw of Chronic Pain Spring Devotions,  we call this Optivity."

 

Optivity (our word for envisioning positive thought, word, and deed) empowers us to balance the four-seated teeter-totter we talk about throughout this series. Each seat, which makes up our teeter-totter, represents physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual elements of who we are as a total package, and it is based on - and inspired by - the wisdom of the Native American Medicine Wheel. Each seat should be equally off the ground with the same weight and attention.

 

EXPLORING OUR PASSION


There are many ways to become full of life in thinking. We can be present in our compassion for others, be active in mindfulness, and look at things from a different perspective. These things help us broaden the boundaries of not too much, yet enough. It allows us, gives us, permission to explore our hidden talents. For instance, I learned that writing poetry allows me to immerse myself in learning new words and new ways to express something I find interesting. It gives me a different perspective that takes me to a place where I can put my pain or current health issue in the backseat.  It was really fun and rewarding to write this poem.

 

The Promise of Like ©
 
I like camping, picnics, mountains with streams,
Invading my space and into my dreams,
Loony family, self, friends, and birds,
Even failing to speak with words.
 
Fortune to learn, watching children at play,
Scenery, lakes that reflect on the day,
Cakes, spirituality, flowers, a good book,
And cactus that winks with a funny look.
 
Mixed sun, rain, fall, a cloud that churns,
Laughter, antiques, Hummel’s and urns,
Gentle music, dogs, sea horses and cats,
Wildlife inspires me, even the bats.
 
I like promise and hope, flowers I like.
I like beginnings and endings, I just like.



I wrote this poem from a random list of things I like and found a stirring of many passions I might not have thought of otherwise.  Maybe you will try it.


In healing

Think adversity?-See opportunity!

The Pained Ink Slayer



~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~



Additional Reading:  

Saturday, March 6, 2021

Spring Pleasures: Hobbies, Pain Diversion, And Discovery

 

Photograph Courtesy Celeste Cooper, Author

Spring is a time of reawakening after a long cold winter and this year it means so much more. It is a time to explore things that bring us pleasure as we break through the shell of our own winter cocoon.

 

I find great enjoyment in photography, and I am thankful that I have found ways to fill up my thought spaces on this learning journey with my digital Canon EOS. I am grateful to have hobbies that occupy my time in isolation from chronic pain, but this past year has been difficult because of the COVID-19 virus. In some ways, those of us who live with chronic illness have had a head start on the isolation that has affected so many because of this horrible pandemic.

 

That said, I still have plenty to learn about my camera, so there was no shortage of building on the mental seat of this four-seated teeter-totter I try to keep off the ground. Understanding the importance of mental, physical, emotional and spiritual balance has given me the foundation to make it through these trying times.

 

The canvas of life to a photographer is limitless and spring provides many photo ops as the season of birth gives rise to new photo moments. I anticipate a plethora of opportunities as I guide my lens toward my new granddaughter, who is full of light and life. I look forward to capturing butterflies and bees spreading their wings, trees blowing and bowing to the wind beckoning me outside to experience the essence of light and love for photography.

 

…Hobbies create the presence of desire in our lives and keep our mind open to opportunities for exploring our creativity. Learn to make jewelry, read palms, fish, line dance, take photos, make bird houses, collect antique watches, start a joke book, crochet, or hand glide. Take up scrap booking, wood burning, or calligraphy; it's totally up to you… [Excerpt, day 69, Spring Devotions in the Broken Body, Wounded Spirit: Balancing the See-Saw of Chronic Pain series.]

 

My hobbies are huge self-esteem boosters for me as one who lives with chronic pain. 
What hobbies would you like to explore this spring?

 

"We are all subject to the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune; they are around us, in a space we do not control. This book is a gentle, yet forceful reminder that the best defenses against them reside within- in a space we do control, welling up from resources we can learn to cultivate. Hope here is equally soft and irresistible, much like Spring itself."

 

Dr. David L. Katz, MD, MPH, FACPM, FACP

Director, Yale University Prevention Research Center

 

[Inside the Cover, Broken Body, Wounded Spirit: Balancing the See-Saw of Chronic Pain, Spring Devotions.]


In healing,

Celeste Cooper, RN / Author, Freelancer, Advocate

Think adversity?-See opportunity!



~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

Learn more about Celeste’s books here. Subscribe to posts by using the information in the upper right hand corner or use the share buttons to share with others. 

Wednesday, September 2, 2020

AACIPM: Resources For People With Pain



These have been trying times for everyone, and anxious times for many of us living with conditions that cause chronic pain and illness.  Everything I write about, being with people to avoid feelings of isolation, focusing on what we can do, and finding coping mechanisms that promote mental, physical, emotional, spiritual balance has been helpful to me, and I hope our readers. 


When I wrote my last blog, I talked about how we have a leg up on this staying in isolation thing. A lot has happened since then. We know more about COVID, we have better treatments and some options, all the things people living with intractable pain hope to have. However, the virus is not gone and neither is our chronic pain.

 

Though I have cut way back on the computer and social media time in an effort to manage my own pain issues, I cannot let September roll by without expressing the importance of accessing our resources. Therefore, when I got my monthly email from my wonderful group at PAINS-KC with a link to the updated resources at AACIPM, I was excited to highlight this valuable resource for my fellow fibro and chronic pain survivors.

 

WHAT IS AACIPM?

 

"The Alliance to Advance Comprehensive Integrative Pain Management (AACIPM) is the first-of-its-kind multi-stakeholder collaborative, comprised of people living with pain, public and private insurers, government agencies, patient and caregiver advocates, researchers, purchasers of healthcare, policy experts, and the spectrum of healthcare providers involved in the delivery of comprehensive integrative pain management.” Read on…

 

RESOURCES

 

The AACIPM website offers many helpful resources and useful tools for those of us living with chronic pain, such as:

 

  • Apps to help manage pain, track pain, deal with flares, etc.
  • Books written by friends and fellow authors, Toni Bernhard, Dr. Lynn Webster, and more that I look forward to reading.
  • Videos offering summaries and visual aids for understanding pain.
  • A short summary of various websites and the support or information they offer.

 

THE ALLIANCE

 

The patient and pain care providers are the two most important stakeholders for guiding and participating in important research to learn more about chronic pain as a society.  The Alliance to Advance Comprehensive Integrative Pain Management brings the stakeholders together with a united force. You can read about the history, here.


The AACIPM offers a plethora of additional information on symposiums, advocacy, who is participating, and more from those I have had the pleasure of working with in the past. I suspect you will find something that piques your interest.

 

“Those who have learned by experience what physical pain and bodily anguish mean, belong together all the world over; they are united by a secret bond.”

- Albert Schweitzer


Additional Reading:

Pain Justice: A Resource For Chronic Pain Survivors (Posted March 1, 2020)



In healing,

Celeste Cooper, RN / Author, Freelancer, Advocate

Think adversity?-See opportunity!



~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

Learn more about Celeste’s books here. Subscribe to posts by using the information in the upper right hand corner or use the share buttons to share with others. 

Monday, March 23, 2020

Fellow Patients, We Can Help Others Cope With The Side Effects Of This Coronavirus Pandemic


I understand this is a trying time for everyone.  COVID-19 is disrupting the lives of people all over the world. People told to shelter in place are experiencing the effects of isolation. As people living with chronic pain and chronic illness, we know what that means.  We know the experiences associated with having our lives disrupted every day. We can help.





It makes us feel good to share helpful measures with our fellow warriors, and today that includes the world. What can you contribute? Following are excerpts from old blogs that everyone might find helpful during these times.

___________________________________________________




I find great strength, comfort, and diversion through poetry and photography, and I am thankful that I have found ways to fill up my thought spaces by writing for others who share this journey with me. 
 
…Hobbies give us reason to relax and take a break. They are our weapon against boredom and idle hands. They create the presence of desire in our lives and keep our mind open to opportunities for exploring our creativity. Learn to make jewelry, read palms, fish, line dance, take photos, make birdhouses, collect antique watches, start a joke book, crochet, or hand glide. Take up scrapbooking, wood-burning, or calligraphy; it's totally up to you… [Excerpt, day 69, Spring Devotions in the Broken Body, Wounded Spirit: Balancing the See-Saw of Chronic Pain series.]


***Presently, I am working on a jigsaw puzzle I bought a couple of years ago. I had forgotten how much I loved to do them. But, like so many of us, I have to be careful not to sit with my neck bent for too long. The good news is that I don’t need to worry about it being on the table for as long as it takes. We won’t be having company.

___________________________________________________



In my blog, The Setting, the Shutter, and the Power of Resolution, I talked about my 2015 New Year’s resolution - "Learning to use the manual settings on my new digital SLR camera". I think of that blog as a metaphor for transforming adversity into opportunity.

***Photographs speak a universal language. Whether you are taking pictures or going through old albums, we can become mindful and create feelings that soothe us, especially during trying times.

                      ___________________________________________________


BALANCING PAIN AND ILLNESS THROUGH POETRY

For me, writing poetry heightens my senses and provides an alternative path that promotes mindfulness. The words I chose give my thoughts texture, making them palpable, at least to me. Writing poetry provides a beautiful detour because unlike physical pain and illness there are no boundaries, no limitations. We have unabashed freedom to explore and express ourselves using colors, shapes, and concepts we might not otherwise.

I am in awe of the power of randomly chosen words and their ability to bring me peace. Whether I am working through a difficult situation or embracing the wonders of the world, I know when I'm done I have formed a connection to my inner being I only know through poetry.


"Poetry is writing about yourself waiting to see what will show up, the words are the finger points of your soul.”

~Sandford Lyne, author of Writing Poetry from the Inside Out


*** Like photography, poetry is a creative way of chronicling our life’s events and provides a conduit to express our feelings. You may have one you would like to share, maybe one you wrote after you read my blog on how to write “I am” poem. It’s time for all of us to be creative in our own midst ─ to share with others things we never thought we would.

___________________________________________________


As a once board-certified emergency nurse, I know the risk to our people on the front lines of this virus.  I am pleading with people to follow the CDC guidelines. This pandemic is serious. We must take personal responsibility for protecting others and ourselves.


BE THE LIGHT



In healing,

Celeste Cooper, RN / Author, Freelancer, Advocate

Think adversity?-See opportunity!



~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

Learn more about Celeste’s books here. Subscribe to posts by using the information in the upper right hand corner or use the share buttons to share with others. 

Sunday, March 1, 2020

Pain Justice: A Resource For Chronic Pain Survivors




If you are in CRISIS, reach out IMMEDIATELY:
United States:

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline : 1-800-273-8255
Suicide crisis lines are listed by country 
here.





INTRODUCTION

Sadly, since my blog in 2013 — Walk a Mile in my Shoes — not much has changed. Some might say things are far worse. It’s time for a reawakening of patient centered care that embraces the ethical preservation of our right to choose. It is a moral obligation of all parties that all stakeholders are part of every process when discussing the treatment of pain.

Justice  = the principle of moral rightness; decency.

As a registered nurse, patient, and writer, I feel we are forced to work within a system devoid of a plan for addressing the physiological, psychological, financial, and social consequences of living with persistent pain. I also believe that if we want change, we are obliged to share our unique individual circumstances and our life encounters. It’s time to put into words our desires, needs, and rights as a voice for justice.

I hope the following categories allow you easy access to the resource you need for your particular experience. (Links updated February 20, 2020.)

1. Patient Rights
2. U.S. Government
3. Pain Law
4. Pain Advocacy and Patient Resources
5. Medical Organizations
6. Pain News
7. Additional Resources


1.  PATIENT RIGHTS
 


2.  U.S. GOVERNMENT


3.  PAIN LAW



4.  PAIN ADVOCACY AND SUPPORT



5.  MEDICAL ORGANIZATIONS - Pain Medicine

*NIH = National Institutes of Health



6.  PAIN NEWS – Current news, professional journals and patient publications
*Many of the advocacy organizations offer subscriptions to their newsletters



7.  ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

“Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability,but comes through continuous struggle. And so we must straighten our backs and work for our freedom. A man can't ride you unless your back is bent.”- Martin Luther King, Jr.


You can also access this blog from the blog header or in notes for The Pained Ink Slayer page on Facebook, titled Pain Justice: A Resource For Chronic Pain Survivors And Their Families.

Additional Reading:





In healing,

Celeste Cooper, RN / Author, Freelancer, Advocate

Think adversity?-See opportunity!



~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~

Learn more about Celeste’s books here. Subscribe to posts by using the information in the upper right hand corner or use the share buttons to share with others. 

Celeste's Website

Celeste's Website
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