Celeste Cooper RN Author - Educator and Pain Advocate

CelesteCooper.com

Celeste Cooper / Author, Health Pro, Advocate


Think adversity?-See opportunity!


http://CelesteCooper.com

 

People with chronic pain often take more than one medication. Since we can have overlapping or co-existing medical conditions that differ from patient to patient, the medication your friend takes may not be the right medication for you.    Read On >>

Coping strategies can vary among each of us. I write as a way of coping, others learn new hobbies that fit their abilities. What matters most, is that we find positive ways to cope with our pain and avoid the pitfalls of negativity...                      Read On >>

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Beware of the Dragon

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“Determination is strengthened by life’s experiences, purpose, and a clear vision.”


Celeste

BEWARE OF THE DRAGON

It’s important to make safety a priority. Unfortunately, some people would like to make a profit at our expense. Know when to raise a red flag.  





Indications of false claims include: 

  • An ad suggests their product is a “miracle cure.” (If there were a cure, we wouldn't be sick)
  • The ad suggests a treatment that is not backed by scientific evidence. A statement that it is, is not enough. Ask to read the research abstract from a creditable source such as the National Institute of Health’s U.S. National Library of Medicine website PubMed or a peer review journal. 
  • A vitamin, herb, or supplement does not have a contact name listed on the label. (If the manufacturer is reputable, it will be there.)
  • The product is a steroid or other hormonal preparation. (Your doctor should always check your hormone levels to determine need. If necessary, a medication will be prescribed, usually not an over-the-counter drug.)
  • A practitioner claims to be able to cure a disease or syndrome that no one else can.
  • The supposed specialist has no credentials or avoids showing them. (Most of us like to show off our achievements. Look for those diplomas.)
  • Anyone demands a signed financial contract for services instead of listening to your complaint.
  • A person intimidates you or puts you on the defensive. You should not have to defend your illness or what you know works for you.


Read more on avoiding pitfalls and improving communication in  Chapter Two, Communicating Your Health Care Needs and Chapter Four, “ My Body is Matter and it Matters,” in   Integrative Therapies for Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Myofascial Pain: The Mind-Body Connection.